24 November 2010

Soliciting Advice

This is the type of heater that we have. We haven't had to use these heaters yet, but I just turned one of them on tonight. Can anybody tell me anything about this kind of heater? I've never lived in a place with this kind of heater, and I want to know if they are likely to melt things placed to close to them or make fire hazards of things placed too close to them. When my mancub begins to crawl, what will be the best way for me to keep him from touching these things (if we are still using them by the time he starts crawling)?

And on a completely unrelated note - My hospital bag is pretty much packed. I based it on a list I received in my class, which seems to be pretty specific to the hospital where I will deliver. In reading various birth stories, I've discovered that there are a few items that are not on any sorts of list but that are good to bring. For instance, one friend mentioned taking her Boppy pillow with her. When I mentioned this to Eric's cousin, she said that was a very good idea because her arms really hurt after holding her baby so much in the hospital. So, what would you suggest (that isn't on the typical lists) that I take to the hospital?

13 comments:

Jessica Leigh said...

I had heaters like that in Paris. The woman I lived with would didn't have a dryer and would use them as a drying rack -- so obviously things close by weren't causing fire issues. On particularly cold nights I liked to sit on the floor with my back against it while I did my homework -- so they weren't too hot to touch either. That's about as much information on them as I can give though.

Matt said...

Your heater is a radiator. It appears to be the double-pipe variety. Either steam or hot water is piped throughout your building and is allowed to pass through the radiator when you open the valve. I don't think it will get hot enough to be a fire hazard, but it may melt some plastics. You could just open the valve all the way and see how hot it gets. If you're worried about safety next year when your kiddo is mobile, you can buy or make a radiator cover (http://www.google.com/images?q=radiator+cover).

Brianne said...

Your specific list probably has these things on it. But bring your own shampoo and conditioner. (Some hospitals won't have it.) Don't bring former pregnancy clothes. You might fit, but it will probably be uncomfortable. Loose-fitting clothes with elastic bands are better. Things to do. Maybe you'll be lucky, and your labor will go really fast. But sometimes you just sit around. And if they make you stay for any length of time, you might wish for something to do. If I think of some more, I'll let you know.

Brianne said...

I meant pre-pregnancy clothes. But you probably read my mind.

Alice said...

We had this type of heating in our 2nd apt. I really was surprised how well it worked. You will not want the baby touching it while it is hot. you can build a firer place screen to put around it just to play it safe.

Jenn said...

I would definitely add SNACKS to the list. Even if the maternity ward has a snack room as some do, you may want your own favorite things. Plus, if your meals come late or are sick-nasty (like mine! agh!) then you won't starve. I was glad that I brought Gatorade with me. I'd agree with bringing the Boppy. I just used pillows and blankets in the hospital, which worked alright, but then I got home and couldn't figure out how to nurse without the exact same setup as I used in the hospital. I would have liked to have the same "equipment" I was going to be using at home while I had the help of the lactation consultant in the hospital.

Janssen said...

The laptop. I was really glad to be able to check my email, read blogs, and update my blog while I was there.

Also, we took Yahtzee.

Ana said...

The best advice I can give you is to teach your child what hot is and that they should stay away/not touch things that are hot - we taught Michael this using a pot that we had warmed up on the stove - enough so it was warm to touch without being hot. We then let him touch it and then quickly took his hand away telling him it was "Hot" and that it would burn/hurt him - using words like "Ow!" etc. Do this a couple of times till your child gets the point and then you won't need a fire guard/screen etc. You do still need to watch your child though of course ;)

Mariah said...

Swimming togs for Eric. If you're planning on having a water birth (I don't know what you're plans are) and you're also planning on having some sort of hands on support from him (acupressure, massage, just holding) then he may need to be in the water partly depending on what's comfortable for you.

This isn't what happened for us, but I've heard stories.

We also had tons of food delivered to us during labour (not useful then, I just threw it up) that we ate straight after delivery. We were both starving by then.

Lizzy Lambson said...

I liked having the Boppy and my own soft pillows for sure. I forgot to bring my favorite facewash and had someone pick it up for me. It felt good to wash my hair and do my makeup the next day with my own things. And I didn't pack enough comfy clothes--I also had someone bring me more clothes . . . but really, they had everything there that was necessary, so I think I could have shown up with nothing and been just fine.

Angela Noelle of SK said...

1. I'm with Ana on the heater...which one might not have guessed, knowing me...but every kid is different - Esky holds her hand flat and out at anything out and says, "Hoat!" - including when we walk under a hot fan in a store. Before the age where she could do this, she couldn't move fast enough to get near something like that before we were aware of it. For us, it seems her development for coming in touch with that kind of danger was right in line with her development with understanding it. You've got quite a stretch there of immobile baby-time.

2. Your list probably says so, but take clothing for you that is easy to nurse in (if you're planning to) - and I mean easy...not possible...because it can be often, and you are learning...so it's best not to add an extra challenge. I also found taking clothing for Esky that was easy for changing was awesome...keep in mind that newborns fill nappies OFTEN...and if your baby's in cloth (which Esky was in hospital), will not tolerate much wetness at all. You do not want 40 buttons to undo each time...because "each time" is OFTEN. For a girl, this was easy - nighties all the way...just lift, replace soiled diaper, and pull the nightie back down!

Dusty and Amy said...

snacks, chapstick, i took my robe and "sleepy socks" for cold feet. I overpacked, ALWAYS DO. Bring a few outfits (read sizes)for the baby and one that is EASY to put on :-)

CAN'T WAIT!!

Dorothy said...

LOL! Yes, I've melted my backpack to one of those! LOLOL!!! That brought back some memories. My advice... Keep things at least 12 inches away. Plastic will melt for SURE!